Are You Ready for Cosmetic Surgery? – Valvi Girl
fade
2495
post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-2495,single-format-standard,edgt-core-1.0,kolumn-ver-1.0,edgtf-smooth-scroll,edgtf-smooth-page-transitions,ajax,edgtf-theme-skin-dark,edgtf-blog-installed,edgtf-header-standard,edgtf-fixed-on-scroll,edgtf-default-mobile-header,edgtf-sticky-up-mobile-header,edgtf-animate-drop-down,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-4.9.2,vc_responsive

Are You Ready for Cosmetic Surgery?

Some people seem to never age, while others look 10 years older than they are. There are those that can easily shed pounds, while their peers struggle to lose only ounces of unwanted fat. Meanwhile, images of physical perfection torment us from every media outlet.

It is no surprise, then, that cosmetic surgery continues to grow in popularity worldwide. But before you decide to get work done, it doesn’t hurt to learn a little bit about what will be done during the procedure. It’s also a good idea to find out what will be expected from you, the patient, in the days and weeks before and after the surgery is performed.

It’s also important to understand the potential risks and complications which arise from having cosmetic work done. Though rare, Pines Salomon injury lawyers and other major medical malpractice law firms are no strangers to cases involving plastic surgery gone wrong. Take the time to learn these possible dangers before deciding to go through with a cosmetic procedure.

Typical Cosmetic Procedures

Surgeries to improve appearance are many and varied. They run the gamut from quick inpatient procedures to those requiring general anesthesia and a day or more in the hospital. From laser hair removal and eyelid surgery to breast augmentation and rhinoplasty, plastic surgeons earn a good deal of income specializing in just one or two of these transactions. Chemical peels are popular treatments for wrinkles and age spots. Liposuction speaks for itself. Neck lifts, on the other hand, are designed to improve the definition of the jawline. It’s important to note these and other cosmetic procedures are not generally covered by traditional medical insurance or cost-sharing programs.

Complications and Risks

Cosmetic surgery is still surgery — an invasive treatment that can disturb the physiological equilibrium. As such, it is sometimes attended by risks. Anesthesia alone can shock a body with limited immunity, yielding pneumonia, blood clots and–on extremely rare occasions–death. In addition, the place of the incision can get infected, exacerbating scarring and possibly demanding follow-up surgery. Some recipients of cosmetic medical treatment experience a fluid build-up under the skin while others have suffered postoperative bleeding, and also numbness (due to nerve damage) that remains long after the procedure. Although most procedures work out just fine and dandy for thousands upon thousands of patients, the potential complications of cosmetic surgery are common enough to factor into any decision-making.

Anticipating Surgery

Those who are resolved to proceed with cosmetic surgery can minimize the risks through a few common-sense measures. Preparing for surgery begins with questions for yourself and for the surgeon during a one-on-one consultation. Ask yourself about your own physical condition, about your motivations and what results you expect. Subsequently, ask the surgeon about credentials, board certification, and experience with the regimen being considered. How close to the “after” images will your own outcome appear? If you press the surgeon for honesty, he or she is compelled to deliver it. Consider having a physical with your regular doctor to confirm fitness for surgery. Just as importantly, remember that other health care personnel–nurses, an anesthesiologist, a pharmacist–will also be participating in the process.

The bottom line when thinking about cosmetic surgery is to enter the process soberly. Knowing the potential problems that can develop may or may not rule out the procedure. Still, it will blunt any unpleasant surprises that could arise. Likewise, getting as much information from the plastic surgeon relative to how things will unfold lends a peace of mind that the patient might otherwise lack. There is nothing wrong with changing your appearance as long as good health is not a casualty.

No Comments

Post a Comment